Association for Commuter Transportation (ACT) Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Conference Highlights, November 13 – 14, Nashville

Last week, I had the pleasure of attending the ACT (Association for Commuter Transportation) TDM (Transportation Demand Management) Conference in Nashville.  For those not familiar with TDM principles, they basically involve managing vehicular travel demand through incentives/disincentives as well as shifting travel demand to other modes such as transit, carpooling/vanpooling, bicycling, walking, and telecommuting.    Following are some takeaways from the Conference.

  • The Nashville Civic Design Center, a non-profit whose mission it is to positively influence the city’s built environment and improve the beauty and functionality of the city through public participation, has put forth ten guiding principles as well as a Neighborhood Assessment Toolkit to evaluate new projects or designs in neighborhoods throughout the city. The document can be found here:  https://www.civicdesigncenter.org/projects/neighborhood-assessment-toolkit.2567843.
  • People are deliberately moving to places with a high degree of mobility options.
  • Multiple speakers advanced a strategy of pricing parking – particularly in urban centers where parking spaces are at a premium – as a means to promote public health by encouraging the utilization of other modes of transportation (transit, walking, biking, telecommuting, etc.).
  • According to one presentation, health care (seeing our doctor regularly, etc.) only accounts for 10% of our health status, whereas lifestyle (smoking, nutrition, obesity, and alcohol use) and environment determines 70% (the remaining 20% is determined by biology). Consequently, our environment (the presence of sidewalks, bike paths, bike lanes, etc.) can have a significant impact on our health, as such features can encourage us to walk or bike rather than drive to a destination.
  • Employers and employees can reap rewards for employer involvement with van pools.
    • In Olympia, Washington, employers receive reductions in business and occupancy taxes for their participation. The vanpools boost employee morale and wellness (because employees are not fighting traffic on their way to/from work).
    • Sustainable Pittsburgh Challenge vanpool awards white, red, and blue ribbon awards to employers based on activities promoting sustainability.
    • Houston Green Office Challenge is a competition between employers in Houston, TX.
  • Cities and towns need to get smarter about how they think about the use of curb space, which often serves as the boundary between private and public space (the street vs the workplace or living space).
    • Curb space should be evaluated for such uses as bike/scooter use (lanes and bike racks), temporary public use space (perhaps an outdoor seating area at certain times), etc.
    • If a business wishes to promote bicycle commuting and has extra/unused indoor space, such space could be set aside for indoor bike storage and/or showers.
    • For areas with robust transit systems, employers and apartment complexes could include transit status boards in the lobby (or similar) area communicating the location of the next bus, light rail, etc., and the approximate wait time.
    • Increasingly, change/adoption of new public spaces, amenities, etc. in towns and cities are adhering to the following paradigm: A temporary pop-up amenity, followed by a pilot amenity, which is followed by a permanent amenity.  A new bike/scooter lane or public seating area could be examples of this.
    • Digitization enables curbs to be dynamic (used for different uses).
  • If you own/manage a business or serve in a human resources capacity at a corporation, a multi-modal transportation system (carpooling, transit, vanpooling, biking, walking) can benefit you by:
    • Helping you to recruit and retain talent
    • Enhancing health outcomes of your employees, thereby reducing your overall health care costs
    • Enabling your employees to use their time more efficiently

Blacksburgers Clean Up in the Ride Smart Challenge

The Ride Smart Challenge wrapped up at the end of May and we recognized the top performing team (by number of trips) and the top performing individual. This year’s winning team comes from Blacksburg – “The Fightin’ TOBers” – who won by 27 trips over their nearest competition.

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Celebrate Clean Commuting in Blacksburg

We’ll be celebrating in Blacksburg on May 20 to thank those who have taken the clean commute pledge. Stop by, say hello, and enjoy a cup of coffee and a pastry.

Clean Commute participants pledge to use a cleaner commute mode – biking, walking, riding the bus, carpooling – during May. Each trip pledged is an entry for the prize drawings. There’s a Commute Team of the Year competition open to any group (workplace, clubs, informal groups), too.

You can still join the Clean Commute Challenge!

Carpooling and Economic Development – Part 2

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In the previous blog concerning economic development, I argued that carpooling plays an “unsung hero” role in economic development by facilitating face-to-face conversation between professionals in the same industry cluster.  This is an internal opportunity to improve information exchange and coordination within our regional economy and industry structure.  This blog extends that argument and asserts that there are also external opportunities, related to reputation and regional brand, for carpooling, vanpooling and transit to further contribute to our economic development.

The Roanoke Regional Partnership, through its RoanokeOutside.com site, has made great strides in positioning the region’s spectacular outdoor amenities in its regional economic development marketing mix.  Likewise the Roanoke Valley Convention & Visitors Bureau touts outdoor adventures as part of its tourism marketing message.  Clearly, the natural environment and outdoor amenities are key to our regional reputation and our regional brand.

There is one cloud on the horizon that could tarnish our external reputation (external brand) and set back our recent progress.  We could become air-quality non-attainment, with regards to federal standards, for ground level Ozone.  It is important to note that our regional air-quality has consistently improved since the late 1990s.  However, the federal standards have gotten progressively stricter over time.  The national standard is up for a new review this year.

The last time that we were in danger of becoming non-attainment, the local governments entered into a voluntary program to reduce emissions that was successful in keeping us in attainment.  This time the private sector can pro-actively join in and voluntarily help reduce vehicle emissions through carpooling, vanpooling or transit.  If we become air-quality non-attainment it will hurt our reputation, brand and regional economy, through increased state level emissions regulation.  Our clear regional strategy is to proactively ensure that our air remains clean enough to meet the new standard.

There are three simple actions that you can do to help us avoid losing our regional brand equity:

  1. Sign up for RIDE Solutions and carpool, bike, walk or take the bus to work at least one time a week, and become eligible for the Guaranteed Ride Home program in case of emergency.
  2. Refer the HR Department at your work to the RIDE Solutions Workplace (free) program.
  3. If you are already a RIDE Solutions Workplace refer one of your suppliers, partners or customers to RIDE Solutions so that we can get that industry cluster based communication benefit that was the subject of the first blog.

It is that simple.  Together we can have clean air and avoid becoming non-attainment.

Can Carpooling help with Economic Development?

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From “Cluster Analysis for NewVA Region (2004)”

The concept of industry clusters and cluster based strategy has been a vibrant topic in economic development circles over the past couple of decades.  Specific cluster related studies or profiles that cover the combined New River and Roanoke Valleys, Alleghany Highlands and Region 2000 (Lynchburg) have been completed in the past decade and have been useful in regional economic development initiatives.

The famous Harvard Business School professor Michael E. Porter defines clusters in “On Competition” as:

[A] geographically proximate group of interconnected companies and associated institutions in a particular field, linked by commonalities and complementarities.”

He goes on to say that:

Many of the competitive advantages of clusters depend on the free flow of information, the discovery of value-adding exchanges or transactions, the willingness to align agendas and to work across organizations …networks, and a sense of common interest undergird these circumstances. The social structure of clusters thus takes on central importance.

It is precisely in helping to improve the free flow of information, and to solidify professional relationships that carpooling, vanpooling and transit use can make a surprising, and often overlooked contribution to regional economic development.  In a recent blog it was argued that carpooling and vanpooling help facilitate the person-to-person conversations that generate ideas and facilitate teamwork in organizations.  This same effect can be multiplied when carpool, vanpool or transit commuters are from the same industry clusters, but not necessarily the same companies.  The potential for serendipitous discovery of innovative ideas via face-to-face conversations shouldn’t be underestimated.  Carpooling, vanpooling and transit may provide the only opportunities for in person conversations with certain other professionals in the same cluster that otherwise wouldn’t cross your path during your busy workday.  This networking effect was even observed at the recent World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. CNN did a story on the Davos shuttles being the ultimate networking tool at the Forum in some cases even more so than the sessions and events themselves.  If even the world’s business, economic and political elite find value by having face-to-face conversations while sharing a ride, just imagine the hidden potential for regional economic development in our part of Virginia.

Unsung Reason to try Ridesharing

Carpooling can break down barriers within organizations and foster networking and information sharing.

Carpooling can break down barriers within organizations and foster networking and information sharing.

Those who encourage ridesharing often focus on cost saving or environmental arguments to persuade people to try ridesharing. While these are important benefits of ridesharing, one very important benefit often goes unheralded. Ridesharing can be beneficial in improving organizational and team communication and effectiveness.

I personally vow to carpool at least one time per week with another staff member. At first, this arrangement was mostly an effort to “practice what we preach” by making sure we carpooled every week. Over time it became increasingly apparent that carpooling was actually helping us become more effective in our jobs. Although we don’t have a large staff, 11 people, staff members are distributed among two floors in the same building. The effect of a “stairwell barrier” is alive and well even in a small organization. My carpool partner and I have offices on separate floors, and carpooling has been indispensable in fostering communication on joint projects and generating ideas for synergies between seemingly separate projects. It would be hard to estimate the level of economic value that unexpectedly comes from carpooling. I have no doubt that in our case it is real.

As organizations of all sizes flatten and cross-functional teams become the norm, carpooling and vanpooling may become surefire ways to ensure that adequate communication is taking place between workgroups. Likewise, technology has enabled new telework and hybrid distance working arrangements. On those days when part-time teleworkers are coming into the office, person-to-person conversations in carpools or vanpools may prove indispensable to team and workgroup effectiveness. Finally, employees involved in travel, telework or distance work often miss-out on the regular personal in-office networking opportunities that, despite rapidly changing technology, are necessary for effectiveness and career advancement. Carpooling or vanpooling, as little as once a week, could help employees keep up their personal professional relationships.

Readers of this blog who are employed in large organizations, or organizations that make extensive use of workgroups and teams, please encourage your employer to become a best workplace for commuters and to use carpooling or vanpooling to help strengthen team communication and effectiveness.